Image from page 596 of “Hardware merchandising (January-June 1902)” (1902)

Some cool sheet metal machined parts made in china images:

Image from page 596 of “Hardware merchandising (January-June 1902)” (1902)
sheet metal machined parts made in china
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: hardmerchjanjun1902toro
Title: Hardware merchandising (January-June 1902)
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Hardware industry Hardware Implements, utensils, etc Building
Publisher: Toronto :
Contributing Library: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: Algoma University, Trent University, Lakehead University, Laurentian University, Nipissing University, Ryerson University and University of Toronto Libraries

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
echanic in Shop Talk.Take every job that comes along, and situp nights figuring how spiral gears are tobe cut in a lathe, how milling is to be donewith a grinder, and various other things that will develop. Not only kinks, buttangles, will be among them. When people come in and ask you if youcan fix a sewing machine, a wringer, a babycarriage, an umbrella or a watch, tell themyes, and take it, for if they are told acouple times that your shop is not justequipped for that particular job, they wontcome with the next one, and the other fellowwill get it. Do the work somehow, andyou will find that the saying, Necessity isthe Mother of Invention, is true. Dontdo the easy part of a job and turn the restover to a shop with a larger equipment, forthey will get the profit if you do, which issmall enough on the whole thing anyway,and you will come out in the hole. Bydoing the hard part is just how to learn. Start up a repair shop to find out howmany impossible jobs are possible. £ •■:*»«

Text Appearing After Image:
130 CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL AN INGENIOUS MACHINE. THE accompanying illustration showsthe patent automatic lock seambody maker and soldering machine,which is manufactured by G. A.Crosby & Co., Limited, Sarnia, Ontario. Itis one of the machines of their well-knownautomatic can making line, and which willproduce from 30,000 to 36,000 can bodies,side seam locked and soldered, in a tenhours run. This machine is one of the greatest im-provements of the age in can-makingmachinery. The body blanks are placed byan attendant on an automatic device whichcarries them into dies where hooks areformed in the ends of the bodies whencethey are passing automatically to a form-ing horn where they are formed with hooks to date in every particular. They are man-ufacturers of presses, dies and sheet-metalworking machinery, especially machineryfor manufacturing tin cans, either auto-matically or by hand. AMERICAN VS. ENGLISH MACHINERYIN CHINA. Apropos of the frequent announcementsgoing the rounds of

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 64 of “Sunset” (1898)
sheet metal machined parts made in china
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: sunset74jansout
Title: Sunset
Year: 1898 (1890s)
Authors: Southern Pacific Company. Passenger Department
Subjects:
Publisher: [San Francisco, Calif. : Passenger Dept., Southern Pacific Co.] Menlo Park, CA : Sunset Publishing Corporation
Contributing Library: Internet Archive
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
arently changing it, andat the same time adding to the appear-ance of the fireplace unit? To find outhow much smaller the opening shouldbe, experiment by using a big sheet ofcardboard to cover part of the mouth,until you find the proportion that ef-fectively stops the smoking. (If indoubt as to proportions, send to Wash-ington, D. C, for Farmers BulletinNo. 1230.) An inexpensive and practical methodis to build a grate and fender as illus-trated here. The minimum height ofthe grate and fender is 14 inches, and,as the height of the opening in the aver-age fireplace is between 30 and 34inches, this actually cuts the openingdown to about a third its original size.Any machine-shop worker can makesuch a grate. The fender is most attrac-tive, made out of hammered copper andwrought iron; if no one is found whodoes this work, have a mechanic makeone out of sheet metal. The fender isneeded not only for looks, but in orderto decrease the draft under the fire.Being loose, it can be easily removed

Text Appearing After Image:
while one cleans out the ashes andsweeps the hearth. The front of the grate is made of% by li/j-inch soft steel. The bottombars of the grate are cut from I/2 by114-inch bars, and are spaced % inchapart, resting at front and rear on 2 by2-inch angle iron. If the grate is 20inches or over in depth, it is better tohave the center supported by anotherangle iron. The center grate bars areleft loose, so that they can be turnedover or replaced in case of warping. Inmost fireplaces the back is narrowerthan the front, in which case the trian-gular sides of the bottom of the grate(see sketch) can usually be made outof a piece of y^ by 6-inch sheet ironcut at an angle. It will be found veryconvenient to have the grate resting ontwo or more U-shaped legs for slidingit into the fireplace opening, though itcan be supported on bricks. Rivets(5/16-inch size) are used and %-inchholes are drilled which should take careof any inaccuracies in lining up theholes. The grate should be set in threeinches fro

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.