Launch party of the tanker ‘British Cavalier’

Launch party of the tanker ‘British Cavalier’

Check out these prototype machine company pictures:

Launch celebration of the tanker ‘British Cavalier’
prototype machine company
Image by Tyne & Put on Archives & Museums
Guests attending the launch of the tanker ‘British Cavalier’ at the North Sands shipyard of J.L. Thompson &amp Sons, Sunderland, 19 June 1962 (TWAM ref. DS.JLT4/PH/1/700/1/1).

This set celebrates the achievements of the renowned Sunderland shipbuilding firm Joseph L. Thompson &amp Sons. The company’s origins date back to 1846 when the firm was recognized as Robert Thompson &amp Sons. Robert Thompson senior died in 1860, leaving his second son Joseph Lowes Thompson in handle. In 1870 the shipyard completed its last wooden vessel and was then adapted for iron shipbuilding.

By 1880 the firm had expanded its operations more than a lot of North Sands and in 1884 completed the building of Manor Quay, which served as fitting out and repair facilities. For numerous years in the late nineteenth century the yard was the most productive in Sunderland and in 1894 had the fourth largest output of any shipyard in the globe.

The Depression affected the firm severely in the early 1930s and no vessels had been launched from 1931 to 1934. However, in the course of these years the company created a hull design giving greater efficiency and economy in service. In the course of the Second Globe War the prototype created by Joseph L. Thompson &amp Sons proved so common that it was utilised by the US Government as the basis of more than two,700 Liberty ships built at American shipyards in between 1942 and 1945.

Right after the War the North Sands shipyard went on to develop several fine cargo ships, oil tankers and bulk carriers. Sadly the shipyard closed in 1979, although it briefly reopened in 1986 to construct the crane barge ITM Challenger.

(Copyright) We’re satisfied for you to share these digital photos within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite ‘Tyne &amp Put on Archives &amp Museums’ when reusing. Particular restrictions on higher good quality reproductions and industrial use of the original physical version apply even though if you happen to be unsure please e-mail archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Construction of the bulk carrier ‘Fernriver’
prototype machine company
Image by Tyne & Put on Archives & Museums
Lifting the forecastle unit of the bulk carrier ‘Fernriver’ into spot at the North Sands shipyard, Sunderland, 9 September 1966 (TWAM ref. DS.JLT/4/PH/1/718/five).

This set celebrates the achievements of the renowned Sunderland shipbuilding firm Joseph L. Thompson &amp Sons. The company’s origins date back to 1846 when the firm was known as Robert Thompson &amp Sons. Robert Thompson senior died in 1860, leaving his second son Joseph Lowes Thompson in manage. In 1870 the shipyard completed its last wooden vessel and was then adapted for iron shipbuilding.

By 1880 the firm had expanded its operations more than much of North Sands and in 1884 completed the construction of Manor Quay, which served as fitting out and repair facilities. For numerous years in the late nineteenth century the yard was the most productive in Sunderland and in 1894 had the fourth biggest output of any shipyard in the world.

The Depression impacted the firm severely in the early 1930s and no vessels were launched from 1931 to 1934. However, for the duration of these years the business created a hull design and style providing greater efficiency and economy in service. Throughout the Second Globe War the prototype developed by Joseph L. Thompson &amp Sons proved so well-liked that it was used by the US Government as the basis of over two,700 Liberty ships built at American shipyards amongst 1942 and 1945.

Right after the War the North Sands shipyard went on to build numerous fine cargo ships, oil tankers and bulk carriers. Sadly the shipyard closed in 1979, despite the fact that it briefly reopened in 1986 to construct the crane barge ITM Challenger.

(Copyright) We’re pleased for you to share these digital photos within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite ‘Tyne &amp Wear Archives &amp Museums’ when reusing. Certain restrictions on high good quality reproductions and industrial use of the original physical version apply even though if you are unsure please e-mail archives@twmuseums.org.uk